Ask Free Unlimited Question
Join the 2 Crores+ Student community now!

Arrhenius Theory For Acids And Bases

Updated On: 17-7-2020

This browser does not support the video element.

Answer

Step by step solution by experts to help you in doubt clearance & scoring excellent marks in exams.

Text Solution

Open Answer in App

Solution

<h1><span style="font-size:16pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Arrhenius Theory</strong></span></span></span></h1> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Arrhenius definition of acid-base reactions </strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">An acid-base reaction is a chemical reaction that takes place between an acid and a base. Several concepts exist that give elective definitions to the reaction mechanisms included and their application in solving related problems. Despite several differences in definitions, their significance as various methods of analysis becomes obvious when they are used to acid-base reactions for gaseous or fluid species, or when acid or base character might be somewhat less clear.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">The Arrhenius meaning of acid-base reactions, which was devised by Svante Arrhenius, is an improvement of the hydrogen hypothesis of acids. It was used to give an advanced meaning of acids and bases and followed from Arrhenius&#39; work with Friedrich Wilhelm Ostwald in proving the presence of ions in aqueous solution in 1884. This led to Arrhenius receiving the 1903 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. </span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Important Terms</strong></span></span></span></h2> <ul> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Hydronium -The hydrated hydrogen ion ( H<sub>&nbsp;&nbsp; </sub>O<sup>+ </sup>).</span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Acidity - A measure of the total concentration of hydrogen ions in solution</span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Alkalinity A measure of the total concentration of hydroxide ions in solution</span></span></span></span></li> </ul> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Definition of Arrhenius Acid and Base</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">&nbsp;An Arrhenius base is a substance that gives hydroxide (OH<sup>&ndash;</sup>) ions after dissociation in water. A base increases the formation of OH&ndash; ions in an aqueous solution.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">An Arrhenius acid is a substance that gives hydrogen ions (H+) after dissociation in water. An acid increases the formation of H+ ions in an aqueous solution. This protonation of water yields the hydronium particle (H3O+); presently, H+ is used as a shorthand for H3O+ because it is presently realized that an exposed proton (H+) does not exist as a free species in liquid.</span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Limitations of the Arrhenius Theory of Acid and Base</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">The Arrhenius definitions of alkalinity and acidity are confined to aqueous solutions and allude to the concentration of the solvated ions. As per Arrhenius definition, pure H2SO4 or HCl dissolved in toluene are not acidic, despite the way that both of these acids will give a proton to toluene. Likewise, under the Arrhenius definition, a solution of sodium amide (NaNH2) in liquid ammonia is not soluble, despite the way that the amide particle {NH}<sub>2</sub> will promptly deprotonate alkali. Thus, the Arrhenius definition can just describe acids and bases in an aqueous solution.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">Releated Videos:</span></span></strong></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/introduction-to-acids-and-bases-9773605" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">Introduction To Acids And Bases</span></span></a></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/chemical-properties-of-acids-and-bases-9773607" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">Chemical Properties Of Acids And Bases</span></span></a></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/bronsted-lowry-acids-and-bases-9864962" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">Bronsted Lowry Acids And Bases</span></span></a></span></span></span></li> </ul> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Arrhenius Acid-Base Reaction</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">An Arrhenius acid-base reaction is characterized as the reaction of a proton and a hydroxide particle to create water molecule: </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">H<sup>+</sup>+ OH<sup>-</sup> </span><span style="font-family:Wingdings">&agrave;</span><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"> H<sub>2</sub>O </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Thus, an Arrhenius acid base reaction is simply a balance reaction</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">According to Bronsted and Lowry</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">- A base is a chemical species that has the inclination to gain (or accept) a proton.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">- An acid is a chemical species that has the inclination to lose (or give ) a proton. </span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Implications </strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Given that a proton can&#39;t exist as free in aqueous solutions, it follows that &quot; a substance can act by acid just in the presence of a base&quot; and the other way around &quot;a substance can carry on as a base just in availability or presence of an acid&quot; </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">In terms of the Bronsted and Lowry hypothesis, a substance can give a proton in particular if another substance is prepared to accept it and the other way around.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">HA + B &nbsp;</span> <span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">&nbsp;A-&nbsp;+ HB+</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Some substances can act as bases in respect of specific substances and as acids &nbsp;with others &rarr; amphoterism</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">H<sub>2</sub>O + NH<sub>3</sub>&nbsp;&nbsp;&hArr;&nbsp;&nbsp;OH-&nbsp;+ NH<sub>4</sub>+&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; (water acts as&nbsp;acid)</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">H<sub>2</sub>O + HCl &nbsp;&hArr;&nbsp;&nbsp;H<sub>3</sub>O<sup>+</sup>&nbsp;+ Cl-&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;(water acts as&nbsp;a base)</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">If these reactions have the hint of reversibility (</span><strong><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">&nbsp;&hArr;</span></strong><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">), we conclude that they can also go the opposite way; for instance, Cl<sup>-</sup> could take a proton from H3O+ giving back HCl. This happens; however, to a degree of no consequence. Species that vary for 1 proton are called conjugate acid - base pairs (es: HCl/Cl-, H3O+/H2O). </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">In an acid-base reactions we can conclude the rcelative concentrations of the two species of the pair. It is anyway necessary to know the idea of acidic and basic strength.</span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Limitations of Bronsted-Lowry Theory</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">The Bronsted-Lowry hypothesis does not justify some reactions that happen without transfer of protons. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">&bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;According to Lewis </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">- acidic substances are those that can acknowledge a couple of non-bonding electrons. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">- basic substances are those that can give a couple of non-bonding electrons.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">For example: </span></strong>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">AlCl3&nbsp;+ Cl- </span></span><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">&nbsp;&nbsp;&hArr; AlCl4-</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">this reaction can be considered an acid-base. The aluminium is ready to gain a couple of electrons, and along these lines behaves as a Lewis acid, while the Cl- ion lose a couple of non-bonding electrons and subsequently acts as a Lewis base. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">It should be seen that a base as indicated by Bronsted is also a base as indicated by Lewis. A Lewis base can always associate a proton through a couple of non-bonding electrons. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">A Bronsted acid needs a proton to transfer. This condition is not needed with a Lewis acid, it requires an orbital to associate an electronic doublet.</span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Arrhenius Definitions</strong></span></span></span></h2> <h4><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri Light&quot;,sans-serif"><strong><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Key Points</span></strong></span></span></span></h4> <ul> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">An Arrhenius acid increases the convergence of hydrogen (H+) ions in an aqueous solution, while an Arrhenius base increases the grouping of hydroxide (OH&ndash;) ions in an aqueous solution. </span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">The Arrhenius definitions of alkalinity and acidity and are limited to aqueous solutions and allude to the convergence of the solvent ions. </span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">The universal aqueous acid&ndash;base meaning of the Arrhenius idea is described as the formation of a water molecule from a proton and hydroxide particle. This way, in Arrhenius acid&ndash;base reactions, the reaction between an acid and a base is a balance reaction.</span></span></span></span></li> </ul> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Arrhenius Acids Examples</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">A very good example of an Arrhenius acid is hydrochloric acid, HCl. It dissolves in water to create the hydrogen particle and chlorine particle: </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">HCl &rarr; H+ (aq) + Cl-(aq) </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">It&#39;s considered an Arrhenius acid because the dissociation increases the quantity of hydrogen ions in the aqueous solution. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Different examples of Arrhenius acids include sulfuric acid (H2SO4), hydrobromic acid (HBr), and nitric acid (HNO3). </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Examples of Arrhenius bases are sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and potassium hydroxide (KOH).</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Important Chapters:</span></strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/chemistry-ncert-solutions" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT&nbsp;Solutions for&nbsp;Chemistry</a></span></span></li> </ul>

Acid Base Theory|| Arrhenius Theory||Bronsted Lowry Theory||Lewis Acid Base Theory
According to Arrhenius acid-base theory, the strength of acid and base depends on
आरिनियस सिद्धांत के आधार पर अम्ल एवं क्षार को उदाहरण सहित समझाइए।
Define Arrhenius acid-base theory with one example.
What are acid and base according to Arrhenius theory?
Give the Limitations of Arrhenius concept theory of acids and bases.
Define an acid and base according to Arrhenius theory .
Discuss the Arrhenius theory of acids and bases. What are its limiations ?
Acid - Base Theories (i) Arrhenius (ii) Bronsted Lowry Theory (iii) Lewis,pH and pOH
Arrhenius theory could not explain the acidic nature of
Arrhenius theory could not explain the acidic nature of
Arrhenius theory is failed to explain the acidic nature of
अम्ल-क्षार की आरहेनियस अवधारणा बताइये।
According to Arrhenius, what is acid and base ?
???? ? ????? ?? ??????? ???????? ?? ??????? ?? ???????

Very Important Questions

FAQs on Acids, Bases And Salts

Introduction To Acids And Bases

Arrhenius Theory For Acids And Bases

Chemical Properties Of Acids And Bases

Different Types Of Indicator

Reaction With Metal

Reaction With Metal Carbonate And Metal Hydrogencarbonate

Reaction With Metal Oxide

Reaction Of Non Metal Oxide

Caustic Soda

Ph Scale

Latest Blog Post

SRMJEEE 2022: SRMIST has announced Exam Dates
The SRM IST has released the SRMJEEE exam dates 2022. The SRMJEEE 2022 will be held in three phases. Check SRMJEEE 2022 exam dates here.
Haryana Schools Reopening with 100 Per cent Capacity from Dec 1
The Haryana School Reopening from Dec 1. The Haryana Education Minister Kanwar Pal has ordered to reopen schools with 100% capacity from Dec 1.
UP Board Exam 2022: Pre Boards in January, Details here
UP board exams 2022 dates announced by the UPMSP. Uttar Pradesh pre-board exams would be conducted in January 2022 after UP assembly.
JKBOSE Class 11 Time Table 2021 Released, details here
JKBOSE class 11 time table 2021 released. JK board will conduct the class 11 board exams from 11th December to 1st January 2021 for all stream students.
JEE Advanced Revised Syllabus Released for 2023, Check here
JEE advanced revised syllabus released for 2023. The latest syllabus for the JEE Advanced 2023 is available on the official website of the JEE Advanced.
AP NEET 2021 Rank List Released, Check Scores Now
AP NEET 2021 Rank List Released, Check Scores Now. Know steps to check AP NEET list 2021, NEET counselling & FAQs.
Home
Online Class
Doubt?
Download App
Ask Doubt